Bambi's Rules

September 6th, 2010, 12:01 am

     Average Rating: None      
Delicious Add to Mixx!

Author Comments:

Advertisement, August 17th, 2017, 8:05 pm


Post A Comment

User Comments:

white4lima, September 6th, 2010, 1:11 am


On top of that, laws existed before the 10 commandments. Although many of the monarchs who published them claimed to have received them from their deity (ie. Hammurabi).

LollipopBoy, January 31st, 2011, 11:40 pm


Kinda funny that her rules match the golden rule of the bible. :\
Which basically means don't be a dick and be nice to people.

CartoonistWill, February 2nd, 2011, 5:06 pm


I like those rules. Pretty much exactly what Jesus said in Matthew 22:37-40 except without any religious affiliation. I think all people should abide by these two rules, whether religious or not. But almost no one does, including Bambi's author. People keep quoting Mahatma Gandhi's famous line about being the change in the world because it is true and sounds good, but very few actually live it. I'm not sure if this author realizes yet that when he left religion he took his "general spouting of hate" with him and is simply expressing it without a religious backing. I'd like to challenge him to be the change he wants to see in the world - that of spreading love and not hate, no matter one's spiritual beliefs.

@ LollipopBoy - Yeah. It'd be nice for the author to stop playing the straw man card and actually represent both the strengths and weaknesses of each side instead of easily refuted beliefs that most stronger and well-learned Christians don't even believe.

I believe what's important is that both sides learn to love one another and find common ground to improve the quality of life for all instead of spreading hate toward one another. Members of both sides that choose to instead fight each other always claim they are seeking to spread love and tolerance but by their actions show otherwise. I always wonder why this is and how they can't see that they commit the same acts they preach against. I have to admit, I was once an Evangelical Christian like this comic's author and I had been spreading hate around without realizing it. After years of living like this suddenly a light switch turned on inside my head and for the first time I could see clearly. I had no idea how I had been unable to grasp and understand this before, that I was spreading hate. But I didn't leave my faith behind. Why? Because I realized religion wasn't my problem. Hate was. I was simply using religion to focus my hatred (what and who to hate) and to make me feel like I was in the right. But I understand better now the message of love Jesus Christ was trying to spread. No wonder Mahatma Gandhi said he loved Jesus but disliked those who claimed to follow Jesus! I think it would do us all some good to turn our energy not toward attacking one another's beliefs but toward the real problem: the hate inside our own hearts.

liamdelf, February 2nd, 2011, 5:31 pm


Pointing out the fallacies of religious dogma is no more hateful than pointing out the fallacies of pseudo science. I have been known to do both. I am not eschewing venom on anyone. I am not calling for violence against anyone. In fact, I am extremely tolerant of people's belief systems as long as those beliefs do not trample on the rights of others.

I have many friends and loved ones that are devout Christians and I support them in their paths.

I am being the change I want to see in the world. I am thinking for myself and encouraging others to do the same. I am promoting an attitude of peace and love. And I am doing my part to make the world accepting of everyone. Not just those that fit into a certain dogmatic mold.

As you continue to read my comic, I hope you will come to understand this as thousands of others have.

Thank you for your time, and thank you for reading Bambi.

Michael

CartoonistWill, February 2nd, 2011, 8:41 pm


@liamdelf/Michael - Then that's awesome, man. :-)

I wasn't sure since *what I have read so far* was focused just on the fallacies and never the positive aspects of Christianity and that I felt the tone was always harsh, putting religion down instead of promoting the good aspects of religion.

As far as the fallacies go, I agree with you on a lot of what you've brought up as I also dislike these religious fallacies.

But I think it's also important to educate people on what a Christian should believe or how they should live (the best way to point out to a religious person that they are in the wrong is to use their own religion's teachings against them when possible) so as to fairly portray that not all Christians are guilty of the fallacies you are trying to discourage. It felt like maybe that was what you were trying to say about all Christians. I also felt the tone was consistently harsh or hateful, which I know is not the direction you want to go. I think people respond better when the tone isn't so harsh, although these fallacies are definitely often serious. That's why I thought maybe you still struggled with hatred toward people (hatred toward things that hurt people and decrease their quality of life is fine; but it's also important how we treat people who are guilty of these things), but I'm very glad to know I'm mistaken. :-)

I guess to sum up what I'm trying to say is, are you educating people about these fallacies out of love for the people committing them or are you educating people about these fallacies because you intensely hate these fallacies? Your motivation will affect how you approach educating people and your attitude toward them. The latter is the same mistake I made as a young Christian that I believe many religious people struggle with (including the Testament character I mentioned from Dino-Boy.com in another post here). The harsh tone of your comic reminded me of it and I just wanted to make sure you were being careful not to fall into that.

It's hard to understand or discern a person's viewpoint or etc based on only a fraction of it one has seen thus far. My apologies, man. :-) Although I didn't like the tone of the pages I've read so far, I shouldn't have been so quick to make a judgment. But I hope we both keep ourselves in check from falling back into that general spreading of hate, no matter what our spiritual views. ;-) Doing what we do out of love and not hate is the important key that I believe the greats like Jesus and Gandhi taught.

Oh, I wanted to add, in your defense, although Jesus taught a message of love, he also was often sharp/harsh with the religious leaders of his time for their own religious fallacies and hateful ways that hurt people. I guess there's a time to be blunt and a time to be gentle, right? I guess a part of it is I just prefer the gentle. Come to think of it, didn't Gandhi also disagree with the religious leaders and politicians of his time as well? Thanks for this time to share some thoughts, man. :-) I like a good, peaceful sharing of thoughts. Have a great night/day/etc.

liamdelf, February 2nd, 2011, 9:24 pm


You are correct. Both Jesus and Gandhi disagreed with their political/religious leaders. Jesus, at times, was rather harsh in his criticisms toward them. Something else that really isn't clear in the earlier comics is that Bambi and Ted are extreme examples. The purpose of the comic is to illustrate the absurdity of the arguments that are made constantly. It's always the same with no one budging in their ways. What Bambi is fighting against in the comic is the intolerance that seems to be inherent in the evangelical movement. The entire comic started out with Ted attacking her spirituality and her shooting him down with her defense.

Other characters in the comic show different ways to be a good person and a good Christian. Plus, there are characters that are yet to come that will show positive ways to be religious.

As for myself. Yes, I am an Atheist. But my philosophies are closer to Buddhism than anything else. The character of Kanta in the comic is closer to my own spirituality. But even that character is not precisely how I view reality.

I choose the non-violence approach of Buddhism without the Jainist extremes. The Dali Lama is a religious leader that I have a great deal of respect for. I also have a good friend that is a Catholic priest. He may be one of the greatest men I have ever met.

There are wonderful people in all faiths. But there are monsters in them as well. I choose to associate with the wonderful people while trying to expose the monsters for who they are.

IN PRINT

Bambi is now available in print!

s p o n s o r s

Bambi Ballass for President 2012
The National Reality Party

Google Ads

c r e d i t s

Site Design by kingv
Hosted by Smackjeeves